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Thursday, October 29, 2009

Tzfat Stone Mezuzza Covers



Mezuzzas and Kabbalah


The Kabbalistic Explanation of the Commandment of "Mezuzza"

The cornerstone of Luranic (Tzfat) Kabbala is the concept of “tzimtzum” or the concealment of the Divine Light. When God chooses to withdraw his light from the world a void is created, allowing evil to enter. According to Kabbalah man's task is to break through the darkness to discover the light and, or course, God.

Light will disperse the darkness. Kabbalah teaches that wisdom, learning and good deeds are all part of that light. These attributes are seen most clearly in the home.

Battling Evil

The forces of evil are always lurking outside the door. A mezuzza on the door of the house acts as the ray of light which prevents the darkness of evil from penetrating. The mezuzza protects the home and those in it.

What is a Mezuzza?

A mezuzza is a small piece of parchment with a the Biblical verse from Deuteronomy 11:20-21 written on it, It is affixed to the doorpost of a home. This parchment is enclosed by a mezuzza cover which can be simple or a beautiful piece of Judaica.

The Torah promises long life to the homeowner and the homeowner's children when a mezuzza with this verse is affixed to the doorpost of the house.

Tzfat Mezuzzas

Tzfat, the City of Kabbalah, offers mezuzza cover-Judaica made of Tzfat Stone. These mezuzzas are crafted in Tzfat by local artisans from the authentic stones of Tzfat. With a kosher klaf (the klaf, the inserted parchment, must be written by a Jewish scribe in the tradition of the Jewish Torah) these authentic mezuzzas from the City of Kabbalah will bring the blessings and protection of light and goodness to the home and those in it.

Mezuzza covers made of Tzfat Stone – $90

Mezuzza parchments written by Tzfat scribes – $60

To order, contact laurierappeport@gmail.com


Source: www.kabbalaonline.net

www.safed-home.com


Cat is neutered. I've slept for two nights straight without being woken up by him and his friends "arguing" on my porch, on the wall of the yard or in the yard. Best 200 shekels I've spent in a long time.

November hasn't arrived yet but the rains have, which is a good sign for our drought-stricken country. It's early to celebrate, but there does seem to be hope for the Kinneret, our lowest-water-level-on-record fresh-water lake. Now I have to buy the kids some winter boots, get a coat for Gal and try to find some good umbrellas for us all. The umbrella dilemma is a tough one. On the one hand, the cheap ones don't last very well. On the other hand, they all tend to get lost or left behind frequently. I'm one of the first to admit my guilt in forgetfulness. But....I don't have a car anymore so we walk everywhere.


A local craftsman started making mezuzza covers from Tzfat Stone. They are some of the most unique pieces of craftsmanship that I've seen in a long time -- hand-carved Shins "ש" on real stones from Tzfat's wadi. I took some pictures yesterday and am selling them for Shimon. He's a wonderful artisan but doesn't know how to show his work widely. I don't either, but I'm going to plop it up on a few sites to see what the interest is. More people than ever are looking at Judaica and Jewish traditions and connecting, and putting a mezuzza on your door is the first step -- it demonstrates a committment to the outside world while offering a sense of fulfilling a commandment within.

I listed it on EBay yesterday and did a little research so that I could write a bit about the Kabbalistic meaning of mezuzzas. I'm not an expert, but it was so interesting. Here's what I wrote (thanks to Ascent's kabbalaonline for their explanation)



Mezuzzas and Kabbalah

The Kabbalistic Explanation of the Commandment of "Mezuzza"

The cornerstone of Luranic (Tzfat) Kabbala is the concept of “tzimtzum” or the concealment of the Divine Light. When God chooses to withdraw his light from the world a void is created, allowing evil to enter. According to Kabbalah man's task is to break through the darkness to discover the light and, or course, God.

Light will disperse the darkness. Kabbalah teaches that wisdom, learning and good deeds are all part of that light. These attributes are seen most clearly in the home.

Battling Evil

The forces of evil are always lurking outside the door. A mezuzza on the door of the house acts as the ray of light which prevents the darkness of evil from penetrating. The mezuzza protects the home and those in it.

What is a Mezuzza?

A mezuzza is a small piece of parchment with a the Biblical verse from Deuteronomy 11:20-21 written on it, It is affixed to the doorpost of a home. This parchment is enclosed by a mezuzza cover which can be simple or a beautiful piece of Judaica.

The Torah promises long life to the homeowner and the homeowner's children when a mezuzza with this verse is affixed to the doorpost of the house.

Tzfat Mezuzzas

Tzfat, the City of Kabbalah, offers mezuzza cover-Judaica made of Tzfat Stone. These mezuzzas are crafted in Tzfat by local artisans from the authentic stones of Tzfat. With a kosher klaf (the klaf, the inserted parchment, must be written by a Jewish scribe in the tradition of the Jewish Torah) these authentic mezuzzas from the City of Kabbalah will bring the blessings and protection of light and goodness to the home and those in it.

Mezuzza covers made of Tzfat Stone – $90

Mezuzza parchments written by Tzfat scribes – $60




Why won't the counter viewpoint push my apparent sketch?

Tzfat and Mezuzzas


Cat is neutered. I've slept for two nights straight without being woken up by him and his friends "arguing" on my porch, on the wall of the yard or in the yard. Best 200 shekels I've spent in a long time.

November hasn't arrived yet but the rains have, which is a good sign for our drought-stricken country. It's early to celebrate, but there does seem to be hope for the Kinneret, our lowest-water-level-on-record fresh-water lake. Now I have to buy the kids some winter boots, get a coat for Gal and try to find some good umbrellas for us all. The umbrella dilemma is a tough one. On the one hand, the cheap ones don't last very well. On the other hand, they all tend to get lost or left behind frequently. I'm one of the first to admit my guilt in forgetfulness. But....I don't have a car anymore so we walk everywhere.

A local craftsman started making mezuzza covers from Tzfat Stone. They are some of the most unique pieces of craftsmanship that I've seen in a long time -- hand-carved Shins "ש" on real stones from Tzfat's wadi. I took some pictures yesterday and am selling them for Shimon. He's a wonderful artisan but doesn't know how to show his work widely. I don't either, but I'm going to plop it up on a few sites to see what the interest is. More people than ever are looking at Judaica and Jewish traditions and connecting, and putting a mezuzza on your door is the first step -- it demonstrates a committment to the outside world while offering a sense of fulfilling a commandment within.

I listed it on EBay yesterday and did a little research so that I could write a bit about the Kabbalistic meaning of mezuzzas. I'm not an expert, but it was so interesting. Here's what I wrote (thanks to Ascent's kabbalaonline.net for their explanation)



Mezuzzas and Kabbalah

The Kabbalistic Explanation of the Commandment of "Mezuzza"

The cornerstone of Luranic (Tzfat) Kabbala is the concept of “tzimtzum” or the concealment of the Divine Light. When God chooses to withdraw his light from the world a void is created, allowing evil to enter. According to Kabbalah man's task is to break through the darkness to discover the light and, or course, God.

Light will disperse the darkness. Kabbalah teaches that wisdom, learning and good deeds are all part of that light. These attributes are seen most clearly in the home.

Battling Evil

The forces of evil are always lurking outside the door. A mezuzza on the door of the house acts as the ray of light which prevents the darkness of evil from penetrating. The mezuzza protects the home and those in it.

What is a Mezuzza?

A mezuzza is a small piece of parchment with a the Biblical verse from Deuteronomy 11:20-21 written on it, It is affixed to the doorpost of a home. This parchment is enclosed by a mezuzza cover which can be simple or a beautiful piece of Judaica.

The Torah promises long life to the homeowner and the homeowner's children when a mezuzza with this verse is affixed to the doorpost of the house.

Tzfat Mezuzzas

Tzfat, the City of Kabbalah, offers mezuzza cover-Judaica made of Tzfat Stone. These mezuzzas are crafted in Tzfat by local artisans from the authentic stones of Tzfat. With a kosher klaf (the klaf, the inserted parchment, must be written by a Jewish scribe in the tradition of the Jewish Torah) these authentic mezuzzas from the City of Kabbalah will bring the blessings and protection of light and goodness to the home and those in it.

Mezuzza covers made of Tzfat Stone – $90

Mezuzza parchments written by Tzfat scribes – $60




Why won't the counter viewpoint push my apparent sketch?

Monday, October 26, 2009

Cats

Seems to me that these days, whenever something happens everyone wants to let the world know about it.

D'ja get up on the wrong side of the bed? Twitter it.

Did you have an especially great peanut butter and jelly sandwich for lunch? Status update on Facebook.

Three of my kids are my friends on Facebook (I'm actually surprised that they befriended me) so I'm hesitant to do ANYTHING there, besides for work (which is what I mostly do with FB). And I've never felt comfortable tweeting. So this blog will be my forum for today's status update, which is that I am VERY ANNOYED with my cat.

Louie is, as one might guess by his name, a male. Every night Louie goes out and dukes it out verbally with the other local males. They're all too well-bred to actually fight, so they sit on my wall and wail. Loudly.

Thus, aside from my sense of duty to prevent more unwanted neighborhood kittens, I have a vested interested in getting Louie neutered. Once demasculated, he will not be competing with the other local toms for the tomisinas. And I may be able to sleep through the night.

So this morning I was pleased when Louie showed up for breakfast, which he doesn't always do. I had a vet's appointment, a borrowed car and a cage lined up, and all I had to do was to shove Louie in and get to the vet by 8:15a.m.

Or so I thought. Halfway to the car, Louie managed to open the cage door and off he went. Now I have to start the whole process over again. But I will prevail! In the meantime, Louie is still out there, balls intact.....

Sunday, October 18, 2009

I had been expecting my cousin for Shabbat. She and her husband, from Toronto, are in Israel for their first-ever visit. She's actually my father's first cousin. She has been in tons of places throughout the world, usually some far-off village in South America or Africa doing aid work. My father's whole side of the family is very into "social justice" and "human rights" and this cousin, now probably in her late '60s, has never been interested in making her donation and going home. She goes to these little places and does whatever she can to alleviate suffering.

This time, the Canadian Government (they're from Toronto) sent her to Georgia to help -- not Sherman's Georgia, but Shevernatze's Georgia. Anyway, she was "in the neighborhood" so she's finally here in Israel! Unfortunately by the time they'd finished traveling (her husband met her here) they were wiped out so they spent Shabat in Tel Aviv and are on their way up today.

It's so exciting to have family come to visit. First of all, I just enjoy it. And secondly, it gives my kids a sense of family that I think is really important. Of course, it's hard for them to put it all together ("she's who's sister? And how is he related? And your grandmother had how many siblings? And where does everyone live?) because they don't know very many of the relatives -- when I was growing up, we knew the basic lineage of the lines of my great aunts and uncles because they all lived in the same area. But it's changed a bit -- we obviously don't live near anyone, and actually the extended family which was once centered in Detroit, dozens of cousins and aunts and uncles, has now mostly left.

On the other hand, that's life. And you never know.....last week, I went to the wedding of some friends' daughter -- #6 of 7 kids. The first 5 are all married with children, and all through the wedding, the grandchildren, numbering over a dozen so far, dashed in and out between legs and under tables. So establishing a new line is another way to express the importance of family. Someone just told me that the American Jewish birthrate is 1.1 children per couple. And that's INCLUDING the 6+ kids-per-family of the average Orthodox family.

Really sad.

Thursday, October 08, 2009

Vacation Days

According to my contract at work, I'm entitled to half of the intermediate days of the holiday as vacation days (Chol HaMoed). This year, Chol Hamoed is the whole week, from Sunday - Friday, so I get 2 1/2 days off. These vacation days are a problem, because I get used to getting up late, having my coffee leisurely, wandering around to the stores that I want to go to, making myself a yummy lunch....yup, I really get used to this type of life. And then I think "how am I EVER going to go back to work?"

My soldier-daughter was in Tzfat yesterday with "her" soldiers, the ones who are doing the course that she is working with. It's called "Nativ" and is for soldiers who aren't Jewish and are thinking of converting -- mostly Israelis who have grown up in Israel and are very Israeli, but whose fathers are Jewish and mothers aren't (mostly from the Former Soviet Union) so they will need to undergo conversion if they wish to be Jewish. The course takes them on trips and teaches Zionism and Judaism as a preparation, for whoever wants, to do the conversion seminar afterward.

Last time they were in Tzfat, Yochi didn't bring them to the Tourist Center where I work, but this time she did, and of course, I wasn't there. I felt a little bad.....she finally brought them to my place of work which is actually quite interesting. But gee, I loved my day off! (She came home for an hour for a shower and to check her Facebook)

We had renters for a few days this week, so there's a lot of laundry. Yochi is bringing a friend for Shabbat/Simhat Torah, and my nephew and his friend might stay too. So I need to do the sheets NOW. But before I do anything else, I will go up to town for some vegetables and some new scarfs......Mica (the hat-eating hound) has gotten ahold of two of my hats this week and I need some replacements.

Tuesday, October 06, 2009

Succot. Succas all over the city, every walkway, every sidewalk, even on some streets.

As one walks along the street, you pass by families who are eating their meals in their succas, kids who are playing games with their siblings and friends in the succas, and even sometimes you can see someone snoring away in their succa. Very different from America, where everyone's succa is in their backyard.....here, no one thinks twice about erecting their succa on the sidewalk next to theri house if they don't have another spot available.

We're lucky. Not only do we have a porch where we can build our succa, but it's a 2-second walk from the kitchen, making it incredibly easy to use. I worked for the first 3 days of the holiday, but now I have 2 days coming up, and I'm looking forward to just sitting in my succa to read, have a cup of coffee, or hang out with a friend. Problem is, I have so many other plans for my days off....

Hagai is around most of the day, but goes out with his friends at night. Margalit has been shipped off to Tel Aviv for a day with her sister, which is kind of fun for me too.....it's so QUIET and I don't have to worry about what a horrible parent I am because she's spending so much time on the computer. (Of course, I'm sure that while she's with Ariel in tel Aviv, she's watching a bunch of TV and playing on the computer there too, but such is life) My nephew just showed up with a friend from Jerusalem, and even with the room downstairs rented out, we found a corner for them.

My Moroccan neighbors are having their yearly Succot Simhat Beit HaShoeva, an evening of food, music (LOUD) and entertaining. WHY do Moroccans have to be so loud? This year, I found a new method of self-preservation. I just drank a bottle of wine, and for some reason, the loud music doesn't bother me too much. Wonder why....

I'm fading....time to go to sleep. Happy succot. (I guess that I'm not drunk enough to spell badly....so far, so good, huh?)